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About Deviant Artist Senior Member Ashley WaltersFemale/United States Groups :iconcgpepper: CGpepper
 
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Deviant for 11 Years
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Statistics 135 Deviations 2,219 Comments 206,550 Pageviews

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My full terms of Use can be found here:

lithriel.deviantart.com/journa…

The condensed version: All my artwork is protected by copyright law. I hereby claim that my work is NOT in the public domain. You may not alter my work in anyway, claim my work to be yours, publish my work in any form, or unlawfully collect profit from my work.

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Heroes of the Storm by lithriel
Heroes of the Storm
So I did a contest entry.  It's the biggest piece I've ever done. I learned several new techniques in the rendering of this piece, and I've painted enough rock to last a life time. I want to give a shout out to my husband who so kindly sacrificed his time to play these characters so that I might reference them. What a swell guy.

Don't even ask how long it took. I don't want to know.

-------------------

Adobe Photshop CS6 + Wacom

Original dimensions: 3666 x 2198px 
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Stone Elemental by lithriel
Stone Elemental
My favorite piece to date. Heck yeah! This mom of three can make baddies as mean as any dude out there.

Art direction by Gary Cox. Commissioned by Petroglyph Games.
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The greatest asset of an artist seeking work is an outstanding portfolio. I can think of no other industry in which skill level can trump a degree to such an extent. Self taught? No problem. Prove you know what you're doing and you're hired. But how do you know what to include in your portfolio? Is it really that big of a deal?

Portfolios are an illustrator's resume, and therefore ought to be handled with as much precision and editing—“proofreading” if you will. Wonky anatomy, like spelling errors, can push away prospective employers. Before you show your masterpieces to the world ask yourself if what you've chosen is the best representation of what you have to offer, and soak in these expert tips from illustrators Donald Wu, Neil Swaab, and Chris Oatley:

1. Pick Only Your Best Work

According to children's illustrator, Donald Wu, a “portfolio is only as good as its weakest piece.” Nothing in your portfolio should be less than good. Otherwise clients will question your ability to deliver at the level they expect and that could cost you future work. Start your portfolio with a strong piece, and end it with a strong piece to leave a lasting impression.

2. Less is Better than Mediocre

Aim for ten to fifteen pieces to display—twenty at the most, but only if the work is good enough. “It’s better to only have five incredible pieces, than five incredible pieces and ten mediocre ones,” says art director, illustrator, and instructor Neil Swaab. Focus on quality over quantity, and take the time to create new pieces instead of using sub-par work as filler.

3. Show Professionalism

Showcase your work with care, whether that be in a nicely bound portfolio or a well-designed website. Also important—let your professionalism spread beyond your portfolio into your communications with prospective clients. Disney character designer Christ Oatley shares the industry's number one portfolio pitfall: unprofessional communication. “The animation industry is based on relationships. If we begin every potential relationship with an untidy, misspelled, poorly written, slang-laden communication, the relationship will last about as long as it takes the receiver to click “DELETE.”

4. Show Consistency

There's something to be said of an artist who can successfully execute several different styles, but in a portfolio setting show only the type of work you want to be doing. Hate doing environmental concept art? Weed it out. Not only will your work be more consistent, your style will be too. “An art director wants to know that, when they hire you for a job, they’re going to get exactly what they expect,” Swaab says. “If your work is all over the map, you’ll make the back of their neck hairs stand on end.”

5. Be Relevant

And finally, be mindful of whether or not your work matches the needs of recruiters and contacts. “If you are applying to work as a character designer but your portfolio is filled with logos you did for your grandma’s punk band, you will just waste the time of those generous enough to review your work,” Oatley says. Be sure you have examples of the type of work they need before you present yourself.

So get out those pruning shears and go to work to make your portfolio one stellar experience your clients won't forget. Time to do a bit of weeding myself.

***

Like me on facebook and follow me on twitter for the most up-to-date news and art tips.

twitter.com/ashwaltersart
www.facebook.com/ashleywalters…


Sources:  5 Common Pitfalls Of Concept Art & Illustration Portfolios | Content and Your Illustration Portfolio | How to Build an Illustration Portfolio

Revamping my website. It's gonna be awesome!
To all my dolling friends, I am going to be deleting all of my bases in the next couple of weeks or so. If you want them, save them now. You are free to distribute them to whoever for whatever reason. Just credit this account. Dolling has been a wonderful springing board to help me into digital illustration and I will forever be grateful for the amazing community that has been a part of my life through the years. I am now at the point in my career where I am ready to move on. I am pruning my account of everything sub-par and plan on redoing my website as well. It's been great though.

If you haven't already, please like me on facebook and follow me on twitter for the most up-to-date news and projects in the works!

twitter.com/ashwaltersart
www.facebook.com/ashleywalters…
  • Mood: Joy
  • Listening to: Piano Guys
  • Reading: Soul Thief: A Demon Trappers Novel

The greatest asset of an artist seeking work is an outstanding portfolio. I can think of no other industry in which skill level can trump a degree to such an extent. Self taught? No problem. Prove you know what you're doing and you're hired. But how do you know what to include in your portfolio? Is it really that big of a deal?

Portfolios are an illustrator's resume, and therefore ought to be handled with as much precision and editing—“proofreading” if you will. Wonky anatomy, like spelling errors, can push away prospective employers. Before you show your masterpieces to the world ask yourself if what you've chosen is the best representation of what you have to offer, and soak in these expert tips from illustrators Donald Wu, Neil Swaab, and Chris Oatley:

1. Pick Only Your Best Work

According to children's illustrator, Donald Wu, a “portfolio is only as good as its weakest piece.” Nothing in your portfolio should be less than good. Otherwise clients will question your ability to deliver at the level they expect and that could cost you future work. Start your portfolio with a strong piece, and end it with a strong piece to leave a lasting impression.

2. Less is Better than Mediocre

Aim for ten to fifteen pieces to display—twenty at the most, but only if the work is good enough. “It’s better to only have five incredible pieces, than five incredible pieces and ten mediocre ones,” says art director, illustrator, and instructor Neil Swaab. Focus on quality over quantity, and take the time to create new pieces instead of using sub-par work as filler.

3. Show Professionalism

Showcase your work with care, whether that be in a nicely bound portfolio or a well-designed website. Also important—let your professionalism spread beyond your portfolio into your communications with prospective clients. Disney character designer Christ Oatley shares the industry's number one portfolio pitfall: unprofessional communication. “The animation industry is based on relationships. If we begin every potential relationship with an untidy, misspelled, poorly written, slang-laden communication, the relationship will last about as long as it takes the receiver to click “DELETE.”

4. Show Consistency

There's something to be said of an artist who can successfully execute several different styles, but in a portfolio setting show only the type of work you want to be doing. Hate doing environmental concept art? Weed it out. Not only will your work be more consistent, your style will be too. “An art director wants to know that, when they hire you for a job, they’re going to get exactly what they expect,” Swaab says. “If your work is all over the map, you’ll make the back of their neck hairs stand on end.”

5. Be Relevant

And finally, be mindful of whether or not your work matches the needs of recruiters and contacts. “If you are applying to work as a character designer but your portfolio is filled with logos you did for your grandma’s punk band, you will just waste the time of those generous enough to review your work,” Oatley says. Be sure you have examples of the type of work they need before you present yourself.

So get out those pruning shears and go to work to make your portfolio one stellar experience your clients won't forget. Time to do a bit of weeding myself.

***

Like me on facebook and follow me on twitter for the most up-to-date news and art tips.

twitter.com/ashwaltersart
www.facebook.com/ashleywalters…


Sources:  5 Common Pitfalls Of Concept Art & Illustration Portfolios | Content and Your Illustration Portfolio | How to Build an Illustration Portfolio

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:iconcocoletta:
Cocoletta Featured By Owner May 7, 2015
Have you read The Demon trppers Serie ?
Reply
:iconlexi247:
Lexi247 Featured By Owner May 4, 2015
Just stopping by to say hello :hug: Have a wonderful day!
Reply
:iconljekc:
LJEKC Featured By Owner Apr 2, 2015

Hello, it's an honor for me to welcome you in Fantasy-NPC :) (Smile)


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Reply
:icongiantpanda:
GiantPanda Featured By Owner Mar 6, 2015  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I love your fantasy art!
Reply
:icondoctorci:
doctorci Featured By Owner Edited Nov 29, 2014  Student General Artist
hey lithriel what happened to the sequel Things Unseen is cancelled is no more or what
Reply
:iconlithriel:
lithriel Featured By Owner Dec 11, 2014
I might have lost all my work on it. My computer went kaput about three weeks ago. I have a new computer and I've been rewriting the Price of Victory, but I'm honestly not sure what's in store after that.
Reply
:icondoctorci:
doctorci Featured By Owner Dec 11, 2014  Student General Artist
well good luck in you future projcts and i hope you be writing the sequel of Things Unseen one day 
Reply
:iconbarananduen:
barananduen Featured By Owner Sep 3, 2014   General Artist
Dropping by to wish you a very happy birthday. I hope you have a great time with family and friends, and may the coming year bring you great happiness and success!
:hug:

:party: :hoLA: :cake: Remnants Carameldansen 
Reply
:icondaeien:
daeien Featured By Owner Sep 3, 2014
Happy Birthday! :D :party: :cake: :party: :D
Reply
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